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Image Manipulation

Overall Image manipulation can fall into two categories – Technical manipulation and Creative manipulation.

Technical manipulation is used for restoration or enhancement of an image. The most common among them are the modeling advertises. Almost all models have been digitally airbrushed, retouched, corrected and almost digitally altered in every way to achieve that perfect look. This is more noticeable in lingerie ads where the skin has been retouched in such a way that it appears flawless from top to bottom. So how is this immaculate look achieved? The image is first smoothed out using a “healing brush”, which automatically removes blemishes and spots from the skin. So after just a few clicks you have nice plain skin, with no markings what so ever and then they are airbrushed to give them that nice smooth glow.

Another example of everyday technical manipulation would be in the magazines. The most highlighted of which, would be the 1982 cover of the national geographic where a photo of two pyramids were brought closer so that it would fit in the cover. It triggered the debate of whether the image manipulation was appropriate in journalism as the image depicted something that did not actually exist.

Creative manipulation on the other hand is more of an art form. It is used for commercial advertising for companies striving to create more interesting and breathtaking advertises. Creative manipulation can create extraordinary images that come right off the page with the help of Image composition. Here multiple photos are used to create a single image and 3D graphics design. It also takes us one step forward out of Photoshop into graphics design as both graphics design and illustrator capabilities have surpassed anything that Photoshop could offer to the creative mind.