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Monthly Archives: April 2017

Cutting Out Images Using Photoshop

You should start by opening a photo in Photoshop and examine the person or object that you want to cut out. You should select the object that you are cutting out. One of the best tools to use to make the selection is the Quick selection tool. For ideal results you should ensure that you select the entire object. You should note that it’s always better to select a lot of background than to miss a critical part of an object.

After making the selection, you should copy and paste it where you want. When you paste the new image will appear as a new layer above the background layer. To hide the layers you should click the Eye icon that is usually beside the background layer. Once the object is on its own layer you will be able to easily change the background to anything that you want.

If you want to remove the background of a photo without erasing any part of the object you should use the eraser tool. If there are missing elements in your photo you should use the clone stamp tool. You should Alt-click the area where you want to take a sample and then drag the tool over the missing elements of the photo.

You should fill in the missing edges using clone stamp tool. To do this you need to Alt-click the edge near the top of the photo and fill the area below it. If the edges aren’t clear after filling them you should use the eraser tool to clean it up.

If there are some elements of the photo that aren’t in good shape thus need to be reshaped you should use the liquefy filter. Once everything is in order you should resize the photo to your desired size. You can also wrap or transform it using the Transform options under the Edit menu.

Great Results for Baby Photoshoot

If you are planning for a baby photoshoot, you need to know some factors that can greatly affect the results. You need to know some things that you can use as your guide in order to be successful in getting the best photos of your baby that you can surely cherish for the rest of your life. Below are some tips that expert baby photographers share.

– Make sure that your baby is in good mood. If you want a picture of him or her smiling and enjoying his/her day, make sure that your baby has enough sleep so he/she can be playful in the photo session. If you want a picture of him/her sleeping comfortably, on the other hand, make sure that he/she is not hungry before sleeping and he/she does not feel so cold or so hot.

– Bring your baby’s favourite toys in the photoshoot. This is great way for you baby to feel at ease and comfortable while in a photoshoot with places and people that’s new to him/her. You can either bring your baby’s stuffed toy, blanket or his/her favourite baby bottle.

– Always be visible in your baby’s sight. This is also another way to making your baby feel comfortable and at ease. You can also bring with you his/her siblings especially if you are doing a playful photoshoot. This will encourage your baby to smile more and play more.

– Bring comfortable clothes and shoes. As much as you want your baby to look good in the photos, your number one priority when it comes to the clothes and the shoes she/he will have to wear is comfort. It is even much better if you let your baby try the new clothes and shoes first at home before the photoshoot so he/she will be used to it and feel a lot more comfortable. Your baby’s comfort should always be your top priority.

Camera Aperture

The size of your camera aperture is controlled by settings called f/stops. An f/stop can also be likened to the human eye as the iris which controls the size of the eye’s pupil. Similarly the smaller the f/stop value (iris) the larger the camera aperture (pupil) and the more light that passes through the lens to the cameras sensor. The larger the f/stop value the smaller the aperture and the less light passes through..

Digital cameras will allow you to choose from an f/stop range dependent on your camera lens capabilities. For example purposes let’s say from f/stop 1.4 to f/stop 8. Imagine that you are sitting in a dark room, the pupil in your eye (camera aperture) will be fully open to allow enough light through to your eye’s retina to enable you to see more clearly. This would be f/stop 1.4 on our example scale. If you then walk out of the dark room into bright sunlight the pupil in your eye would close considerably to prevent you from becoming blinded by the sun. In our example scale this would mean the aperture would close to f/stop 8.

This example uses extremes at both ends of the f/stop scale but of course there are steps in between. If you change your aperture setting on your camera from f/1.4 to f/2 the camera aperture is smaller than it was at the f/1.4 setting and It lets half as much light pass through the lens to the cameras sensor than it did at the f/1.4 setting. This remains true each time you move to the next highest f/stop value.

If however you change your aperture in the other direction from f/2.8 to f/2 then the reverse is true and the aperture is now larger than it was at the f/2.8 setting and twice as much light passes through to your camera’s sensor. This is again remains true each time you move to the next lowest f/stop value.

Changing your aperture f/stop value has two different effects on the end result of the photo you take. It determines both how much of the photo will be in focus (the depth of field) and working in conjunction with your ISO and shutter speed values determines how bright or dark your photo will come out.

Depth of Field

The term depth of field refers to how much of an image is actually in focus. When you look through your camera and focus on a subject there will be some amount of material both in front of and behind the subject that is also sharp and in focus. After that focus will drop off and anything that is further away from your focal point will appear soft or out of focus. As a general rule approximately 1/3 of the range of material in focus falls in front of the focal point and 2/3 of the range of material in focus falls behind the focal point.

Image Manipulation

Overall Image manipulation can fall into two categories – Technical manipulation and Creative manipulation.

Technical manipulation is used for restoration or enhancement of an image. The most common among them are the modeling advertises. Almost all models have been digitally airbrushed, retouched, corrected and almost digitally altered in every way to achieve that perfect look. This is more noticeable in lingerie ads where the skin has been retouched in such a way that it appears flawless from top to bottom. So how is this immaculate look achieved? The image is first smoothed out using a “healing brush”, which automatically removes blemishes and spots from the skin. So after just a few clicks you have nice plain skin, with no markings what so ever and then they are airbrushed to give them that nice smooth glow.

Another example of everyday technical manipulation would be in the magazines. The most highlighted of which, would be the 1982 cover of the national geographic where a photo of two pyramids were brought closer so that it would fit in the cover. It triggered the debate of whether the image manipulation was appropriate in journalism as the image depicted something that did not actually exist.

Creative manipulation on the other hand is more of an art form. It is used for commercial advertising for companies striving to create more interesting and breathtaking advertises. Creative manipulation can create extraordinary images that come right off the page with the help of Image composition. Here multiple photos are used to create a single image and 3D graphics design. It also takes us one step forward out of Photoshop into graphics design as both graphics design and illustrator capabilities have surpassed anything that Photoshop could offer to the creative mind.