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Monthly Archives: January 2017

Exposure Value System

Similarly, shutter speed steps are also either half or twice as fast as its neighbour (so 1/30th – for example – is twice as long as 1/60th, and 1/60th is half as long as 1/30th).

Thusly, a number of different combinations of aperture size and shutter speed all produce the same degree of exposure. For example, f/5.6 at 1/60th provides the same level of light exposure as f/8 at 1/30th (where the amount of light halves, and the duration of exposure doubles).

Of course, there are even more permutations; f/8 at 1/30th is also the same as f/11 at 1/15th (half the light for twice as long), or f/4 at 1/125th (four times the light for a quarter of the time), and f/2.8 at 1/250th (eight times the light for an eighth of the time) etc.

A one step change, to either setting, is known as a “one stop” change.

To simplify the process of setting alternative aperture and shutter speed combinations, a German camera shutter manufacturer – called Friedrich Deckel – first developed the Exposure Value (EV) concept in the 1950s. The likely impetus for this was the rise in popularity of colour film, which required greater exposure accuracy than black and white film photography (modern 35mm colour film started to become available in the mid 1930s).

In 1954, numerous camera (and shutter) manufacturers adopted Deckel’s Exposure Value Scale (EVS); including Hasselblad, Kodak, Konica, Olympus, Ricoh, Seikosha and Voigtländer, to name but a few.

They introduced lenses with coupled shutters and, and EV scales, such that, after setting the exposure value, adjusting either the shutter speed or aperture made a corresponding adjustment in the other to maintain a constant exposure.

When camera models with built-in light meters started to emerge, some also metered against an EV scale (as opposed to an aperture or shutter speed scale), and correct exposure was accomplished by transferring the meter’s EV reading to the lens, though adjustment of lens apertures and/or shutter speed settings.

The Exposure Value (EV) is therefore a numerical scale that represents a combination of a camera’s shutter speeds and f-numbers, such that all combinations yield that the same exposure have the same EV value.

More than that, Exposure Value scale steps also align with intervals on the photographic exposure scale. In other words, an increment of one step on the EV scale represents a one step (often referred to as a stop) increase in exposure, and conversely a one step decrease corresponds to a one step reduction in exposure. For this reason, some cameras had, and still have, exposure compensation features that are graded as EV steps (e.g. +/- 2 EV).

For example, if EV 9 corresponds to f/4 and 1/30th of a second, EV 8 is f/4 at 1/15th of a second, and EV 10 is f/4 at 1/60th of a second (plus any other combination of settings that produce the EV scale value).

The EV scale starts at 0, which represents a 1 second exposure at f/1.0. Lenses with an aperture that big are rare, but it’s the same as a 2 second exposure at f/1.4, or a 4 second exposure at f/2, etc.

EV 15 equates to full sunlight with distinct shadows, while EV -4 would be a scene lit by a full moon. An EV is therefore a convenient “system” for describing the quality of light.

The EV scale can thus be used as a rough guide to exposure setting in the absence of a light meter. So EV 14 is hazy sunlight with soft shadows, EV 13 is cloudy bright with no shadows, 12 is overcast, and so on (for a 100 ISO film).

Make Colorful Fleece Photo Blankets

To start putting your photo blanket, you need to determine which side of the fabric to use for the outside of your throw. When I made the blanket, it had a small white edge on the wrong side, where the fabric was bordered. So you can lay the print fabric face down on a flat surface. The wrong side of the fabric will be face up. You can also lay your solid fabric wrong side down, putting the wrong sides of the fabric together, so that the right side out will be face upward. You can put the solid fleece on the top of the quilt as this is much easier to see what you are doing.

Thus, you need to match the edges very carefully. Otherwise, it might look bad from both the sides. If they are not properly matched, you need to trim a side or adjust it for the perfect match. With the help of long straight pins you can match the ends and side together properly. Although, you can add extra pins that make your photo blankets straight and they keep the fabric intact while you work.

Apart from that, you can use a good pair of scissors. One is required for the smooth cutting. The first cut you will make is at your corner. So you can remove a square at the corners, about two inches by two inches deep. You can remove the excessive fabric which is not required. You can make two inches cuts down the side of the fabric. You can start in one corner and cut with a perfect way around the quilt. The whole procedure is depending on the experience that you have earned in your previous days. Based on your experiences and expertise, you may decide to measure your fabric before making your cuts. In this case, you can use a fabric pencil to pre-mark your borders. It is more helpful.

Perfecting the stitch:

Nevertheless, to start the stitch procedure, you can take the solid color strip of materials and wrap it around the print of material. Make sure always use the solid strip to wrap around the other to keep your stitch looking consistent and neat. Before you starting the stitches, there are a couple of challenges that you have to be aware of in order to make the perfect stitches. Sometimes, it can be difficult to get the needle to come out on the inside part of the loop. The best way to make this process easier is to make a larger loop than you would like. You can make a straight line for the bottom part of the stitch and mark the portion where you will start and finish every stitch.

Furthermore, now that you have completed your fleece blanket, you may want to wrap it and give it personalized gift item. However, I personally prefer to put the photo blankets in a gift bag rather than a gift box. The bag maintains their shape properly. At the same time the recipient would happy to receive this type of gift item on special occasions.

Photo Opportunity

Everybody watched as time ticked by. Three minutes later the photographer was yet to take a picture. The woman shuffled her high heels back and forth, patted her scarf at the back, rebalanced the wad of wrapper hung around her right shoulder and returned a bland look at the general audience.

Soon thereafter the woman began to explore reasons for the delay. If the photographer weren’t too tall, and too huge, and old, he would have taken a few pictures by now.

Getting ready for a photograph and not immediately proceeding was what annoyed her about taking pictures at a public event. Younger people can tolerate such an ordeal, but not her, not when in nine months she would become a grandmother.

In a sudden disdain for the photographer, the woman’s gaze swung down, exposing the whites of her eyes. Displeasure conveyed through two scorching eyes is more direct and more stinging than that conveyed through mere spoken words, no matter how acidic.

The offending camera, a Sony, was skewed to the left where it had hooked with the flashlight appendage. The photographer pulled the flashlight out and scowled at it close up, the way African fathers glare at naughty boys, before reattaching it to the side of the camera.

He reassured himself that everything was fine. Just because he hadn’t taken a picture yet didn’t mean he was inactive. Credit, he knew, only goes to those who show results, never to those who show activity. However, he had expected better treatment from the woman, who – had he married early – was young enough to be his daughter.

Another idea flew into the woman’s head. If the old man, like many men at this age, was short-sighted and unable to read her eyes, she might at some point scream at him.

But screaming, she decided, would not only mess up her perfect picture body but might further irritate the old man. An action once taken can produce a myriad of unpredictable reactions. The photographer might feel threatened and resort to taking her picture when she was looking at her worst. Preserving her beauty by staying still trumped any delay caused by his inefficiency.

Over his camera, the photographer gazed at the woman. She was a statue of bright color in a garden full of colors. Her pink scarf tied around her head still held up high. The sheet of folded blue wrapper hung over her right shoulder draped down to her hip. But her perfect picture face had begun to melt a little at the edges.

Then he moved his finger over the snap button, and the woman knew something was about to happen. ‘At last,’ she sighed. The man had begun to get control of the situation. The flashlight appendage was behaving, and the camera apparatus felt sturdier in his grip.

Retouching A Photo

Avoid Relying On Tutorials

While you will learn a thing or two on how to retouch a photo by reading tutorials, you should avoid relying on them as the photo retouching tools change every now and then. The best way of going about it is ensuring that you fully understand a program before you work with it. This way you will be able to retouch a photo even if you don’t have the tutorial with you.

Be Cautious Of Curves

“Curves” is a very powerful tool in photo editing. If you are a beginner you should be very cautious of how use it. If you don’t have any experience with the tool you should consider turning the blend mode to luminosity in order to prevent the curve from impacting the color and skin tones.

Ensure the Eyes Are Sparkling

For the photo to have a perfect finish you should retouch the eyes and ensure that they are sparkling. One of the best tools to use in getting the sparkling eyes is the Eye Doctor actions. As rule of thumb you should avoid overusing the tool in order to prevent the eyes from looking fake.